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America Ferrera

10 Latinx Stars That Should be Nominated for an Emmy

We’re disappointed but we’re not surprised. Yet again 2020 is another year with no Latinx people getting Emmy nominations. It’s not that we haven’t tried – 2019 featured some amazing talent. From MJ Rodriguez’s iconic role as Blanca in the critically acclaimed Pose to Julissa Calderon’s stand out performance in Gentified, this year was filled with nuanced and heartfelt performances.

Even though these Latinas haven’t been nominated, we decided to celebrate them anyway. Here are the 10 Latinx stars that were robbed this year.   

MJ Rodriguez, Pose

For two seasons MJ Rodriguez has shined in the role of Blanca, showing us that chosen family is everything. The fact that her iconic performance hasn’t been recognized is simply wrong. It’s hard to think of other characters on TV that are more important than Blanca at this moment.

Rita Moreno, One Day At A Time

Speaking of icons, Rita Moreno clearly needs no introduction. For decades she’s graced us with her presence on the big screen and is still the only Latina to have won an Oscar and that was in 1961. However the Emmys seemed to have forgotten how to recognize greatness. Her role on One Day At a Time deserves an Emmy period. 

Melissa Barrera, Vida

Melissa Barrera’s Lyn has gone through quite the transformation over the course of Vida’s three seasons. In the latest installment, we were particularly impressed with how she expressed vulnerability and change while staying true to her core. Truly, an award-winning performance.

America Ferrera, Superstore

Superstore, while one of the few network shows on the list, deserves our recognition because of America Ferrera and her character Amy Sosa. As Ferrera explains “I just love that Amy doesn’t care if you like her. That’s so liberating for a female character to sort of walk around and say, ‘I don’t need you to smile at me. I’m just trying to get through the day.’ And she started in a place of really just trying to survive.”  

Ser Anzoategui, Vida

Vida is one of our favorite shows and Ser Anzoategui’s is part of the reason why. As Lyn and Emma’s mother’s not-so-secret partner, Ser has given us a character that gives us all the feels. Their acting chops are undeniable and deserve recognition. Also maybe let’s get rid of gendered categories all together? See Ser’s address to the academy

Julissa Calderon, Gentefied

Gentefied is one of our favorite new shows of 2019. Produced by America Ferrera, Gentefied gives us a world where we can see ourselves and Julissa Calderon as Yessika Flores gives Gentefied its activist center. It’s a role made for her and one that deserves recognition.

Tessa Thompson, Westworld

Tessa Thompson continues to be one of our favorite Latinx actors, from playing a badass superhero in Thor to the complex and nuanced Charlotte of Westworld. This show continues to play with the particularly relevant ideas around technology, data, and humanity. Is she a robot or human or both? Thompson is always keeping us on our toes and deserves recognition for this complex dynamic role. 

Stephanie Beatriz, Brooklyn99

While detective Rosa Diaz is one of the best parts of Brooklyn 99, we’re still hoping the show pivots from being about cops. Let’s not forget the episode that is completely dedicated to her coworkers’ challenge to get her to smile or her coming out as bisexual in season 5. 

Jessica Marie Garcia, On My Block

As Jasmine in On My Block, Jessica Maria Garcia does it all. She’s hilarious and over the top. She’s vulnerable and strong. We loved seeing her character join the center group in the third season of On My Block and really, couldn’t think of a girl with a better eyebrow game.

Rosa Bianca Salazar, Undone

In Undone, Rosa Bianca Salazar acts through a rotoscope animation effect and makes Alma more believable than most people on camera. Questioning the nature of reality, time, and space while also figuring out who you are is no small feat and Rosa never misses a beat. Give her all the awards!

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Ugly Betty Has the Beauty We Need Now

For the past few weeks, I’ve been lucky (and privileged) enough to shelter with my family. Every night, we’ve huddled in my parents’ room and watched our favorites: Cinderella (the one produced by Whitney Houston starring Brandy, the only version that matters) Pride and Prejudice (the one with Colin Firth and Jennifer Eyle, also the only version that matters), Anne of Green Gables (the 1980s version, obviously), and finally, the one and only Ugly Betty, starring America Ferrera.

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Ugly Betty has always been more than a show to me. From her braces to her wavy, frizzy hair to her well-intentionally bold yet slightly off-putting wardrobe, America Fererra’s Betty Suarez was, like no Latina I’d ever seen, simply herself. A Latinx girl with bookish tendencies, a never-ending work ethic, and a love of writing. Of course, I’d seen Jennifer Lopez, Selma Hayak, and Jessica Alba on screen but I viewed these women as wildly out of my league. With their perfect hair, curvy yet athletic figures, and horas that practically dripped sex, these women more closely resembled figments of Hollywood’s imaginary Latinas than myself or any of the women I know. And while they were certainly hot, they lacked dynamic storylines and any true autonomy, usually playing the maid or sexy alternative love interest.  

Ugly Betty is wonderfully different, and something I had never seen on television. It centers a woman who rejects the Latina stereotype, a character who’s value isn’t in her sexuality, who embraces her Latinx identity and individual quirks, even if it means wearing a poncho from Guadelajara. And Ugly Betty didn’t just give one way to be Latinx. Between Betty, her sister Hilda, her nephew Justin, Justin’s father Santos, her father Ignacio, and Sofia (Selma Hayak’s character), these roles break the mold Hollywood too often uses for Latinx characters. A mold that continues to limit how others see us and how we see ourselves.

It’s been 10 years since the show’s finale, and while the outfits and some of the references are definitely outdated (sorry low-rise jeans, never again) Ugly Betty is as relevant as ever. More than just a character, Betty forces us as viewers to question the hypocrisy of a world, and especially a workplace, obsessed with consumption and completely lacking in substance. 

I don’t think it’s a coincidence Betty wears a poncho on her first day to work. A traditional piece of clothing from Latin America that has not only been used to stereotype the Latinx community but also has recently been subverted into a fashion must have. By wearing her poncho, Betty exposes the deceptive rules the Latinx community navigates of where and when our culture is appreciated or ridiculed. The beauty and ingenuity of Ugly Betty is that the show plays with these norms with humor and authenticity. As her nephew Justin says in the first episode, “All the stuff you want to do, owning a magazine, doesn’t happen for people like us, unless you’re JLo or something.” But Betty finds a way to succeed without becoming a Latina bombshell or undergoing one of those horrifying now-they’ll-see-me-and-take-me-seriously makeovers – and that’s a story that deeply resonates today.

This world view, this continued freshness isn’t an accident. Ugly Betty was written and developed by two Latinx writers, including the late brilliant Silvio Horto, and produced by both Selma Hayak and America Ferrera. It is only when we are given the opportunity to tell our own stories that we are able to expand how stories are told about ourselves and our communities. Ugly Betty paved the way for more inclusive dynamic television proving that diversity shouldn’t be an afterthought. The fact is when you put people of color in front and behind the camera you simply get good television. Television with characters that are authentic complex and make other characters cis white ones like Mode’s Editor in Chief Daniel Meade even more interesting. 

But what makes Ugly Betty so wonderful and great for this moment in time is how it centers goodness. Much of the message of the first season is about the value of family, character transformations (except for Betty), and the value of just being nice. In season one, Betty’s positive spirit and general goodness infiltrate the capitalist, shallow world of a fashion magazine. And without a ridiculous makeover or shopping montage, Betty reforms her misogynist boss into a self-aware ally that supports her. The truth is Betty doesn’t conform to the world she lives in, she subverts it. 

While many of us are sheltering in place and worried about our loved ones, it feels good to watch a show where the heroine wins. Where characters get rewarded by simply being nice and to watch TV that doesn’t demonize, tokenize, or scapegoat immigrants. Instead in Ugly Betty the message is simple be who you are and don’t change, just wait for others to catch up.  

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Why the Golden Globes Prove We Need to #MakeLatinasVisible

Last week, The Golden Globes announced their nominees, and it didn’t take us long to realize that no Latinas were nominated this year. Sigh. To be clear, we weren’t surprised but disappointed. After all, it was the 2015 Golden Globes that confused Gina Rodriguez for America Ferrera. For the past 74 years, only 12 Latinos have won Golden Globes and out of the 12 only 3 have been women.

The Only Latinx Winners in Golden Globe History EVER

  1. Rita Moreno, “Best Supporting Actress” in West Side Story, 1961
  2. Andy Garcia, “Best Supporting Actor” in The Godfather Part III, 1990
  3. Jimmy Smits, “Best Actor in a TV Drama Series” in NYPD Blue, 1995
  4. Benicio del Toro, “Best Supporting Actor” in Traffic, 2000
  5. Alejandro Amenabar, Director, “Best Foreign Language Film” for The Sea Inside, 2004
  6. Alejandro Gonzales Inarritu, “Best Motion Picture” for Babel, 2006 and “Best Director – Motion Picture” for The Revenant, 2007
  7. America Ferrera, “Best Performance by an Actress in a TV Series”, for Ugly Betty 2007
  8. Gina Rodriguez, “Best Actress in a TV Series or Comedy” for Jane the Virgin, 2015
  9. Gael Garcia Bernal, “Best TV Comedy” and “Best Performance By An Actor in a TV Series (Comedy)” for Mozart in the Jungle, Amazon Studios, 2016
  10. Oscar Isaac, “Best Actor in a Mini-Series or TV Movie” for Show Me a Hero, 2016
  11. Adrian Molina, “Best Animated Feature” for Coco, 2017
  12. Guillermo del Toro, “Best Director” for The Shape of Water, 2018

There are countless Latinx actors, writers, directors, and screenwriters that have deserved to win awards (or at least a nomination). From the women of Vida, to Rita Moreno’s One Day at a Time, to the writers of Jane The Virgin, to Mj Rodriguez from the groundbreaking show Pose, we get passed over time and time again.

#MakeLatinasVisible

It’s almost 2019 people! We should not be satisfied with just one film getting all the attention (although we are rooting for Roma to bring home some statues).  You see no one film, TV show, character, or actor can represent something as dynamic as our community, the Latino community. Let’s be real – we purchase 23% percent of all movie ticket sales. We deserve to see ourselves at the highest levels in these award show, represented across the categories for all our meaningful, impressive work.

There are over 55 million Latinos in the U.S. So why do we continue to be shut out of the national conversation? Join us and #WeAllGrow in calling for a change. Let’s #MakeLatinasVisible.

P.S. Shout out to Sandra Oh who will be the first Asian Woman to host a major awards show! Because when women of color win, we all win #WomenofColorUnite!

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