Mujeres to Follow

SBTB Key Art

The Saved by the Bell reboot premiered last week and it appears to be… good? There’s nostalgia yes, but that doesn’t usually equal rave reviews from the establishment (like the New York Times). Of course, we believe its success can be found in its latindad – it stars TWO Latinas in Haskiri Velazquez and Alycia Pascual-Pena and Maria Lopez (you may know him from The Expanding Universe of Ashley Garcia) is a producer. But what do Latinas think? Turns out, we’re pretty into it.

SAVED BY THE BELL -- "Pilot" Episode 101 -- Pictured: Haskiri Velazquez as Daisy -- (Photo by: Casey Durkin/Peacock)

Meet Saved by the Bell’s Haskiri Velazquez, Bayside High’s new Zack Morris

For EW, our favorite Station 19 fan Rosy Cordero notes that the new Zack Morris is a Latinx woman (and interviews the actress who plays her): “Haskiri Velazquez is taking over Zack’s power to freeze time and break the fourth wall as the character Daisy Jimenez on Peacock’s Saved by the Bell revival… [And] she’s elated about what the character will mean to young Latinas.” Read her full coverage.

SAVED BY THE BELL -- "Pilot" Episode 101 -- Pictured: (l-r) Mitchell Hoog as Mac Morris, Josie Totah as Lexi, Alycia Pascual-Pena as Aisha, Haskiri Velazquez as Daisy -- (Photo by: Chris Haston/Peacock)

TV Review: Saved by the Bell Hilariously Returns on Peacock

Meanwhile Diandra of Diandra Reviews it All raves, “Saved By The Bell (2020) is fantastic, and the funniest show to come out this year, which, again, is surprising. The original Saved by the Bell (SBTB) was not really funny. It was campy, colorful, and one of those shows that was so bad it was good. The reboot embraces the original’s 90s colorfulness and camp and vamps it up with Gen-Z’s flashiness, activism, and irreverent humor.” Read her full review.

Meet the Reinvented Saved by the Bell Leading Latinx Ladies, Haskiri Velazquez, and Alycia Pascual-Peña

For Hola!, Jovita Trujillo interviewed not one but both Latina stars, declaring, “Fans of the original show can expect to find easter eggs throughout the season. But even more exciting, they can expect to fall in love with the new Latinx leading ladies Haskiri Velazquez and Alycia Pascual-Peña. Pascual-Peña is a young, up-and-coming, Afro-Latina actress from New York. She’ll next be seen in the upcoming film Moxie, directed by Amy Poehler. On the other hand, Velazquez is a multitalented up-and-coming actress making her mark as one of the most exciting newcomers in the industry.” Read the full interview.

Saved by the Bell original cast

Saved by the Bell Reboot: Is it Worth Your Time?

EIC of Fangirlish and friend of LatinaMedia.co, Lissete Lanuza Sáenz is also a fan (in spite of herself), writing “New characters, a new outlook and some diversity make this the right reboot for the year 2020, and I cannot believe I’m typing this, one of the best reboots so far… A Black teenager and two Latinas, one of them Afro-latina, carry this reboot to new heights, not just because they’re allowed to be who they are and sometimes argue in Spanish – but because the show is never about their identities, but somehow those identities aren’t sanitized either.” Read her full review.

FacebookTwitter
THE QUEEN'S GAMBIT (L to R) ANYA TAYLOR-JOY as BETH HARMON in episode 104 of THE QUEEN'S GAMBIT Cr. COURTESY OF NETFLIX © 2020

We’re still talking about The Queen’s Gambit. There was the initial wave of fawning reviews, then the more nuanced takes (yes the ‘magical negro’ is a problem), the reminder that star Anya Taylor-Joy is (white) Latina, and it goes on. So what do Latina critics think? Let’s dive in.

The Queen’s Gambit Offers a Winning Combo of Escapism and Period Drama

A.V. Club’s Danette Chavez gave it a B, noting “The Queen’s Gambit is like a more introspective The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel: Both series are sumptuous period dramas that track a woman’s rise in a male-dominated field. But The Queen’s Gambit is actually aware that its protagonist can occasionally be a jerk. For all the assured direction and exotic locales—including a jaunt to Paris—Beth’s internal journey is the most captivating element of The Queen’s Gambit. The series may border on wish fulfillment at times, but at least it casts a spell.” Read her full review.

THE QUEEN'S GAMBIT (L to R) ANYA TAYLOR-JOY as BETH HARMON in episode 105 of THE QUEEN'S GAMBIT Cr. COURTESY OF NETFLIX © 2020

Anya Taylor-Joy Explains that Awkward Sex Scene in The Queen’s Gambit

In her Refinery29 interview with Anya Taylor-Joy, Ariana Romero focuses on our favorite topic: sex. She writes, “Most series would only be brave enough to have one cringe-worthy sex scene like Beth’s first. The Queen’s Gambit is chock full of them — and devoid of the nudity and XXX hookups that so many supposedly sexy dramas gorge themselves with just to prove their edge.” Read her full coverage.

THE QUEENÕS GAMBIT (L to R) ANYA TAYLOR-JOY as BETH HARMON in episode 105 of THE QUEENÕS GAMBIT Cr. KEN WORONER/NETFLIX © 2020

The Queen’s Gambit Shows the Protective Power of Beautiful Clothes

While over at VICE, Alex Zaragoza focuses on the fashion. She notes, “Watching Beth dress up in luxurious coats and chic shift dresses as she faces off against chess masters, I couldn’t stop thinking about how she seemed to use fashion as a way of shielding herself against the traumas and stresses of her life… In some ways, the show couldn’t have come at a better time: As we continue to live our lives indoors, clad in sweatpants and comfy tie-dye, we could use a little fashion escapism.” Read her full commentary.

THE QUEENÕS GAMBIT (L to R) ANYA TAYLOR-JOY as BETH HARMON in episode 105 of THE QUEENÕS GAMBIT Cr. KEN WORONER/NETFLIX © 2020

Everything We Know About The Queen’s Gambit Season 2

With the future focus of Seventeen, Tamara Fuentes’ coverage is all about the possibility of a second season (unlikely) but gets some good commentary in: “The Queen’s Gambit is the latest Netflix hit that has viewers buzzing over the crazy world of chess. If you didn’t know how competitive the game was, this series will certainly open your eyes… As a woman, Beth is not taken seriously in her path to become one of the best players of all time.” Read her full coverage.

FacebookTwitter
Justina Machado in One Day at a Time

It’s no wonder that Justina Machado broke out on Six Feet Under. The show centers on the whitey, white, white undertaker Fisher family and the quietness that consumes them. Machado plays Vanessa Diaz, wife of expert corpse restorer and eventual partner Frederico. And she pops against Six Feet Under’s muted background, stealing every scene she’s in with warmth, humor, and humanity. In the nearly ten years since Six Feet Under premiered, we’ve learned to expect such amazing performances from Puerto Rican Machado. And we’re grateful for it.

It’s hard to make a Latinx show without her – she’s Carmen on Elena of Avalar, Reina on Devious Maids, and Maya on Superstore. And even when she’s surrounded by loud and proud fellow Latinxs, she stands out. Remember Darci Factor on Jane the Virgin? As the match-maker reality star, Machado met our favorite Jamie Camil’s Rogelia De La Vega toe to toe, managing to be just as silly, ridiculous, and likeable. She also got possibly the best line on Queen of the South (“Is America as bad as everybody says it is?”) believably playing an over-the-top street-smart, kept Mexican woman who learns how to run her own product after her cartel-member husband is executed for his lack of loyalty. And she did it wearing “leather” jeggings for half a season. A true reina.

With that killer resume, Machado is having a much deserved moment right now. She’s killing it on Dancing with the Stars, making it to the top tier with no sign of stopping. Her One Day At A Time just aired three episodes on CBS, having made the leap from Netflix to CBS’s Pop. And by all accounts, (and our bias) she’s a genuinely nice person.

That’s what makes her Penelope on ODAAT so great. Yes, she’s funny and relatable as the veteran mom trying to raise two kids with the help of her aging but unstoppable mother (national treasure Rita Moreno). But the real reason the show works so well is just how much we root for Machado. We want her to succeed at work (get your RN), at home (get those kids to college), in love (climb that mountain of a man), and really everywhere she goes. She’s the heart and soul of the show and we can watch her do that forever.

In fact, Justina Machado is one of those actors who you’ll watch whatever they’re in because they’re in it. This is our love letter to her, a Latina queen in a time when it’s pretty hard to even get on TV. One Day at a Time should be a studio-exec no brainer but it’s fighting for renewal again because of the prejudice against Latinx content (don’t tell us it’s the ratings – it’s not). There’s still not enough parts for Latinas, even as Machado’s talent obviously is keeping her pretty busy (did you see her dramatic side in the 2020 Netflix film All Together Now?). For now, we just want to celebrate Latinx excellence and excellence is Justina Machado.

FacebookTwitter
Hollywood Diversity Report 2020

There’s lots of talk about diversity in Hollywood right now. And we want to believe it’s working, that Black, Latinx, Indigenous, and Asian femmes are finally getting the TV deals that pipe their stories into our living rooms. But is it all talk?

We DMed Dr. Ana-Christina Ramón, Director of Research and Civic Engagement at UCLA’s Division of Social Sciences to find out. Along with professor Darnell Hunt, Dr. Ramón co-authors the center’s reports on diversity in Hollywood, including their recently released 2020 findings. We took our Twitter relationship to the next level (email) and what follows is a dressed-up version of our “conversation.”

CRISTINA ESCOBAR: Hi! Thanks for emailing with me. I’ve followed you on Twitter for a long time and am always so grateful for your insight. You bring this super important, data-driven perspective to the conversation on diversity in Hollywood and you do it as a Latina. So my first question for you is: can you share what’s the most important takeaway from this year’s report?

DR. ANA-CHRISTINA RAMÓN: Thank you. In terms of the 2020 report in film and television, we found that although the percentage of people of color in front of the camera has increased, the numbers behind the camera are relatively stagnant. Most importantly, we find that diversity in front of AND behind the camera appeals to most audiences. We continue to show that diversity sells.

Latinas are powerful and should never underestimate that power… Tell Hollywood what you want to see through social media, on your smartphone, with your TV remote, and at the movie box office.

CRISTINA ESCOBAR: That makes sense to me. We want authentic stories, not just brown bodies on screen. And to have that, we have to be involved in the story’s creation. So tell me, why is researching diversity in Hollywood important?

DR. ANA-CHRISTINA RAMÓN: The images we see on screen permeate throughout our society. Films and TV are not just entertainment. Media, especially television, acts as a dominant socialization agent. Visual media teaches us how the world works and our place in it. In our culture, media consumption has become an essential part of our daily lives. Considering that people of color are about 40 percent of the population and growing, their underrepresentation in all the major fields of the entertainment industry is particularly problematic and harmful for these communities socially and politically.

CRISTINA ESCOBAR: So true and so frustrating, particularly to me as a Latina. We share that same box on the census — what drew you as a Latina to this work? Why is it important to you personally?

DR. ANA-CHRISTINA RAMÓN: Professionally, I’m a researcher and social psychologist. I’ve always been fascinated by how people view the world and how their perceptions are shaped by it. The way TV and movies shape people’s perceptions about race and ethnicity falls in line with those interests. Also, I’m a native Angeleno, who is the daughter of Mexican and Peruvian immigrants. So, I grew up not far from Hollywood yet never felt truly represented by the industry. And, this issue is very important to me personally as a Latina. I want to see my own experiences on screen, and I want my young daughter to grow up seeing multidimensional characters who look like her on screen as well.

TV and movies shape people’s perceptions about race and ethnicity.

CRISTINA ESCOBAR: Why should Latinas and femme Latinxs care about diversity in Hollywood? I’m a media fan but sometimes I get so frustrated and think we should just burn the whole thing down. I mean, like you said, LA is a Latinx town and even though we’re surrounding the industry, we’re banging on the door, we’re subscribing to their streaming platforms, they consistently fail to do right by us.

DR. ANA-CHRISTINA RAMÓN: Others’ views of underrepresented groups are influenced by the images they see in the media. When there is limited representation, stereotypical characterizations can easily predominate. This has been the case for the Latinx community. It’s in our community’s best interest to advocate for itself and demand change.

Increased and meaningful representation in the entertainment industry will likely have a domino effect on how society perceives Latinxs and how Latinx kids perceive themselves. Advocating for representation in areas like government and the tech industry is as important as advocating for representation in Hollywood. At 18 percent of the population, we should demand that we are proportionally represented, particularly considering our high consumption of movies and streaming television. We shouldn’t be satisfied with minimal representation. We need to understand the power we have as consumers.

Plus, Latinas are often the “herstorians” and archivists of their families. They have so many stories to tell.

CRISTINA ESCOBAR: Ha! I love that. I know whenever I post autobiographical stories it’s the women in my family who speak up. They offer extra details about the familly. They keep track of the narrative. Sometimes, I think that’s half the reason I co-founded latinamedia.co — to have better conversations with my tias. What’s your goal with the Hollywood Diversity Report?

DR. ANA-CHRISTINA RAMÓN: The goal has always been to document the relationship between diversity and the bottom line. In the end, we want to provide industry players and advocacy groups with the data they need for their work.

I grew up not far from Hollywood yet never felt truly represented by the industry… I want to see my own experiences on screen, and I want my young daughter to grow up seeing multidimensional characters who look like her on screen as well.

CRISTINA ESCOBAR: Money talks! The entertainment industry is a business and it’s so valuable to be able to say, “this is affecting your bottom line.” I’m so grateful you are doing this. Anything you’d like to add?

DR. ANA-CHRISTINA RAMÓN: Lastly, I want to make sure every person understands the power they have to influence what they see on TV and in the movies. Most people don’t think they have any power to advocate for themselves in a field they do not belong to. But, virtually everyone partakes in the entertainment industry as a consumer in the U.S. So, be vocal about what you want and choose the content that most appeals to you.

Latinas are powerful and should never underestimate that power. Use it to create change in the entertainment industry. Tell Hollywood what you want to see through social media, on your smartphone, with your TV remote, and at the movie box office.

CRISTINA ESCOBAR: Truer words have never been spoken. And that’s what we’re all about here, using our consumer power, our voices to demand better representation. Gracias otra vez. This has been amazing!

FacebookTwitter
AWAY (L to R) RAY PANTHAKI as RAM ARYA and HILARY SWANK as EMMA GREEN, in episode 109 of AWAY. Cr. DIYAH PERA/NETFLIX © 2020

At latinamedia.co, we don’t care what white guys think. Not about movies, TV, or politics. It’s not that they never have good ideas, it’s just that we’re so tired of hearing their perspective, particularly on things that are not meant for them. So when a show is made for us – for Latinas, for women, for Latinx folks – we want to know what our community has to say about it, not the white guys who usually sound off. And we think you do too. That’s why we created this series, “What Latina Critics Have to Say.” ¡Disfruta!

Flowers

Cruising Rotten Tomatoes, you’d think the only people with opinions on Hilary Swank’s Away are dudes with names like “Ben,” “Brian,” and “Bill.” Seriously, on their main page for the show, there were four times as many men whose names start with B (and I didn’t cheat and count the “Robert”) than there are women, let alone women of color, when we checked. These bros give the woman-led show a measly “critic score” of 54. But women like space/STEM/astronauts too. Hell, we might even be the intended audience for Away. So what do women critics have to say? And by “women” we mean Latinas, obvi:

AWAY (L to R) HILARY SWANK as EMMA GREEN in episode 101 of AWAY Cr. COURTESY OF NETFLIX © 2020

TV Review: Netflix’s Away Is The Grey’s Anatomy of Space

As people who want to live in Shondaland, we get everything we need to know about Away from the Dianda Reviews It All headline (we’re in!). Specifically, she writes, “The heart of Away is what keeps you hooked long enough to see it grow and become the show it wants to be; a realistic, grounded reflection… that everyone struggles, everyone dreams, and, in that, everyone is everyone.” Read Diandra’s full review.

AWAY (L to R) VIVIAN WU as LU WANG, MARK IVANIR as MISHA POPOV, HILARY SWANK as EMMA GREEN, RAY PANTHAKI as RAM ARYA, and ATO ESSANDOH as DR. KWESI WEISBERG-ABBAN in episode 101 of AWAY. Cr. DIYAH PERA/NETFLIX © 2020

In Netflix’s Away, Hilary Swank’s Gotta Leave This Doomed Earth to Save This Doomed Earth

Laura Bradley over at the Daily Beast also has lots of positive things to say about Away. She writes, “Enter Netflix’s Away—a gripping drama that embraces this galaxy of thematic potential while also grounding its action in reality. Oh, and its lead is a powerful, multi-faceted Hilary Swank—whose tenacity brings the show’s stakes to life in visceral, at times unsettling ways.” Want more reasons to watch? Check out her full review.

AWAY (L to R) BRIAN MARKINSON as GEORGE LANE and GABRIELLE ROSE as DARLENE in episode 101 of AWAY Cr. DIYAH PERA/NETFLIX © 2020

Why Netflix’s Away Finale Will Actually Make You Feel Better For Once

And for those ready for spoilers, Refinery29’s Ariana Romero breaks down Away’s finale, saying why it’s the show we need now, “When you listen to [showcreator] Hinderaker speak, it seems inevitable that the Atlas crew can get through anything if they continue to support each other. That message is a much needed emotional balm during our divided times.” Read her full coverage.

Flowers
FacebookTwitter
Julie and the Phantoms

At latinamedia.co, we don’t care what white guys think. Not about movies, TV, or politics. It’s not that they never have good ideas, it’s just that we’re so tired of hearing their perspective, particularly on things that are not meant for them. So when a show is made for us – for Latinas, for women, for Latinx folks – we want to know what our community has to say about it, not the white guys who usually sound off. And we think you do too. That’s why we’ve launched this new series, “What Latina Critics Have to Say.” ¡Disfruta!

Flowers

We can’t help but root for Netflix’s Julie and the Phantoms. This import from Brazil (it’s a remake of Julie e os Fantasmas) stars Boricua Madison Reyes, singing and dancing and reminding us of  the High School Musical stars of old. We wish more Latinas, and particularly Afrolatinas, were paid to review the show but that doesn’t mean we can’t celebrate those who were:

Julie and the Phantoms

Everything We Know About Julie and the Phantoms Season 2

Over at Seventeen, Tamara Fuentes calls Julie and the Phantoms a “gem of a series” and summarizes it like this, “Julie and the Phantoms is Kenny Ortega’s latest hit and the High School Musical and Descendants creator is taking things to the next level with his brand new series.” Find out more by reading her full article.

Julie and the Phantoms

Kenny Ortega’s New Show Julie And The Phantoms Has Ghosts, Music, And Teen Drama — Here’s What Happens In The First Episode

Evelina Zaragoza Medina writes up the show in true BuzzFeed fashion – with lots of gifs and images. Our favorite quote of hers: “Music? A Latinx lead? A ghost rock band?? That’s too many good things to ignore, so I checked out the pilot.” Check out her listicle.

JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS (L to R) JEREMY SHADA as REGGIE, MADISON REYES as JULIE, OWEN JOYNER as ALEX, and CHARLIE GILLESPIE as LUKE in episode 106 of JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS Cr. KAILEY SCHWERMAN/NETFLIX © 2020

Julie and the Phantoms Review – Ghosts, Grunge and 90s Nostalgia

Ellen E. Jones of the Guardian made us feel old with this glowing review: “Netflix might just be on to something with Julie and the Phantoms, a sweet show carefully confected to unite every post-Saved By the Bell generation of TV-watching teens, from the My So Called Lifers (now in their 40s) to the High School Musical heads (late 20s).” Read her whole review.

JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS (L to R) JEREMY SHADA as REGGIE, OWEN JOYNER as ALEX, MADISON REYES as JULIE, and CHARLIE GILLESPIE as LUKE in episode 101 of JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS Cr. KAILEY SCHWERMAN/NETFLIX © 2020

Boricua Rising Star Madison Reyes Rocks the Lead in Netflix’s Julie and the Phantoms

Really, we can’t say enough about Reyes’s talent and Jhoni Jackson writing for Remezcla agrees, “Reyes embodies singer-songwriter Julie in the 9-episode series… Reyes stood out to [creator Kenny Ortega] as more than just a natural fit, but also the absolute ideal—despite having zero prior TV or film credits—among a nationwide talent search.” Read her full coverage.

JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS (L to R) JADAH MARIE as FLYNN, MADISON REYES as JULIE, CHARLIE GILLESPIE as LUKE, OWEN JOYNER as ALEX, and JEREMY SHADA as REGGIE in episode 102 of JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS Cr. EIKE SCHROTER/NETFLIX © 2020

Netflix’s Julie and the Phantoms Is FANTASTIC!

On her YouTube channel, Kristen Maldonado can’t stop talking about the songs, declaring “Another huge highlight of the show for me was the music… Not only are [the songs] catchy, they also really reflect the moments that our characters are dealing with, the issues that they’re going through, the situations they’re in. I thought it was just spot on.” Watch her full review.

Flowers

FacebookTwitter
What Three Latinas Have to Say About the Emmy Nominations

This time is for us – Latinas, women, Latinx folks – and we want to know what our community has to say, not the white guys who usually sound off. And we think you do too. That’s why we created “What Latina Critics Have to Say.” ¡Disfruta!

Flowers

The Latinx community had a great year in television. Pose. Vida. One Day at a Time. The list goes on. The Television Academy should have celebrated our stars but they didn’t. As we work towards fixing that, let’s take a minute and listen to the Latinas who are making the case that the Academy can and must do better. Finally – we agree on something!

The Emmys Need To Stop Ignoring Latinx Women

Ariana Romero identifies the Television Academy’s “latest — and long-standing — racist erasure of Latinx femme talent,” writing in Refinery29, “While the Emmys’ voting body seems to believe Bledel is the only on-screen shining TV star in our community, the 2020 Emmys’ eligibility period was actually an embarrassment of riches in televised Latinx storytelling.” we couldn’t agree more. Read her full article.

Stop Acting Like There Aren’t Latinx Stars Deserving of Emmy Nominations: Opinion

Rosy Cordero drops lots of important points in this EW piece but we particularly love this one: “Critics will say, and have said, that talent from marginalized communities is looking for participation awards, but that’s simply not true. We don’t want anything that we don’t deserve. But it’s important to recognize that we are not playing on a level field. We want to earn a seat at the table, not because of our ethnic makeup but because we are talented and hard-working.” Preach! Read her full opinion.

What the Hell Do Latinx Actors and Shows Have to Do to Get an Emmy Nomination?

While recognizing the “too few” Latinxs nominated, Laura Bradley speaks directly to the problem, writing for the Daily Beast, “Each year, one can attribute the Emmys’ relatively small to nonexistent list of Latinx nominees to various circumstances. Anti-CW bias here, a show that’s lost the attention of the Academy there… But the one thing that seems to remain consistent is the scarcity of nominees itself. And thanks to a few recent cancellations, there are now no Latinx series left on network television. Qué barbaridad.” Read her full article.

Flowers
FacebookTwitter
What Four Latina Critics Have to Say About “Cursed”

At latinamedia.co, we don’t care what white guys think. Not about movies, TV, or politics. It’s not that they never have good ideas, it’s just that we’re so tired of hearing their perspective, particularly on things that are not meant for them. So when a show is made for us – for Latinas, for women, for Latinx folks – we want to know what our community has to say about it, not the white guys who usually sound off. And we think you do too. That’s why we’ve launched this new series, “What Latina Critics Have to Say.” ¡Disfruta!

Flowers

We love that Afrolatina Zetna Fuentes directed the pilot of Netflix’s Cursed. It’s about time we dismantle the King Arthur legend and reimagine it as woman-centric folklore while we’re at it. But should we watch? Latina critics don’t agree (on anything) so we’ve collected a sample of the reviews below to help you decide.

TV Review: Netflix’s Cursed Is A Dark Addition To Your YA Addiction

Diandra Rivera of Diandra Reviews It All likes Cursed… mostly. She writes, “There wasn’t the usual ‘fun’ you expect from YA series, and, though there were instances of magic and lore, the series is, at best, a mythical reflection of colonialism… Frankly, I think what makes a successful YA series is that you dream of and for its characters, and, while Cursed has its struggles, it does make you dream.” Read her full review.

All the Questions We Need Answered in “Cursed” Season Two

Tamara Fuentes over at Seventeen is covering Cursed like it’s her job… And our favorite piece she’s written on it contains some serious spoilers (so be careful if you click through). In it, she writes, “If you still haven’t seen 13 Reasons Why star Katherine Langford’s brand new show, Cursed, then you’re in for a ride. Katherine plays Nimue, also known in Arthurian legend as The Lady of the Lake. However, unlike the original tale, she has the Sword of Power and trust me when I say that she’s ready to take the throne.” Read her full article.

I Watched Netflix’s “Cursed” So You Don’t Have To

Kristen Maldonado was not impressed, saying on her YouTube channel, “I think on paper Cursed sounds like a brilliant story, allowing us to focus on the lady of the lake who plays a crucial role in the stories around King Arthur… [But] it doesn’t feel like the stakes are as high as they could be because everything seems to work out pretty easily for these characters.” Watch her full review.

REVIEW: “Cursed” Changes Up Arthurian Legend for the Better

For But Why Tho?, Kate Sánchez likes Cursed but has this issue, “While Cursed’s themes are important, it falls into the same trap of many other fantasy narratives that uses a central white figure as the way to see marginalization, and in this one, given the diverse cast, makes it stand out all the more… It’s important for narratives that look to tell stories of marginalization and oppression to take them into consideration, even in fantasy.” Read her full review.

Flowers


FacebookTwitter
What Four Latina Critics Have to Say About “Mucho, Mucho Amor”

At latinamedia.co, we don’t care what white guys think. Not about movies, TV, or politics. It’s not that they never have good ideas, it’s just that we’re so tired of hearing their perspective, particularly on things that are not meant for them. So when a show is made for us – for Latinas, for women, for Latinx folks – we want to know what our community has to say about it, not the white guys who usually sound off. And we think you do too. That’s why we’ve launched this new series, “What Latina Critics Have to Say.” ¡Disfruta!

Flowers

Mucho, Mucho Amor: The Legend of Walter Mercado hit Netflix earlier this month and our timeline was full of the Latinx Liberace energy and nostalgia. The capes, the lack of gender conformity, the horoscopes, the amor. Here, we’ve collected our favorite takes and surprise – Latinas don’t agree, even on a legend.

Watch Walter Mercado Offer Mucho Mucho Amor in First Trailer for Netflix Documentary

Rosy Cordero premiered the film’s trailer over at EW, writing, “What the film does exceptionally well is humanizing a man who others admired as a magical being, or even a superhero. Being called a superhero is actually the perfect comparison for a person who enjoyed wearing fabulous capes as much as Mercado did. And Mucho Mucho Amor, well, it’s his origin story.” Read her full review.

Glam, Astrology, & Love: Inside Netflix’s Latinx Love Letter Mucho Mucho Amor

For Refinery29, Ariana Romero writes, “What makes Mucho Mucho Amor — and its leading man — so special, particularly to millennials. It celebrates the exuberant queer glamour of Mercado, his powerful connection to Latinidad, his DNA-level savvy for meme-ability, and his relentless love for other people (the way he says ‘my good friends’ will break your heart).” Read her full review.

Walter Mercado Was Not Just a Legend, He was a Con Man

For Fangirlish, Lissette Launza Sáenz brings the whole truth, writing “A part of me understands the documentary, the celebration, the idea that this larger-than-life figure, one that was always flamboyant, non-binary and transcendent, deserves a spotlight. It just worries me that, for a documentary who pretended to show us the rise and fall of a legend, they only focused on the mucho, mucho amor, and not the mucho, mucho dolor he caused so many people.” Read her full review.

Netflix’s Enchanting Walter Mercado Documentary Radiates with “Mucho Mucho Amor”

Over at the A.V. Club, Danette Chavez points out, “Mercado proved you could be idolized while still being othered, a fact that’s too often glossed over in stories of marginalized people who break down barriers. But that reality couldn’t dampen Mercado’s love–or lust, as he put it—for life, nor does it prevent Mucho Mucho Amor from radiating with it.” Read her full review.

Flowers
FacebookTwitter
18 Críticas to Follow

SOOOOOO it turns out that media criticism is just as f’ed up as Hollywood itself. You see, most film critics are male and pale and this has major effects on which films get to market. But, as you know, white dudes aren’t the only media nerds these days and they certainly don’t speak for all of us. To help you find people’s opinions you might actually relate to, we found 18 amazing mujeres writing on media that you should follow. Like literally, we made a twitter list for you. FOLLOW THEM.

Natasha S. Alford

Natasha S. Alford is an award-winning journalist, taking home trophies from the likes of Harvard, CBS, and GirlBoss. As Deputy Editor of The Grio, she unflinchingly investigates what’s going on in our culture from gun violence to Queen Sugar to electoral politics.

Vanessa Erazo

Vanessa Erazo is KILLING IT at our very own Remezcla, as the “head Cinenerd aka Film Editor.” She does cool shit like getting paid to go to the Tribeca Film Festival, fangirl over Oscar Isaac, and uplift Latino films. Basically, we want to be her when we grow up.

Julianne Escobedo Shepard

The biggest badies in media are called “Editor in Chief” and that’s exactly what Julianne Escobedo Shepard is. Of Jezebel. It’s a little blog. You may have heard of it. Over there, she gets to write and ASSIGN stories on everything from the movies to politics to fashion. Be swoon our beating hearts!

Maria Elena Fernandez

Maria Elena Fernandez is the type of Cubana who always gets a “senior” added after her name. These days, she writes for New York Magazine and Vulture and has contributed to the LA Times, Daily Beast, NBC News, etc. Follow her for the Latina perspective on everything from natural disasters to the Oscars.

Sabina Graves

Writer/director for Grinning Graves studio, Sabina Graves also reps for Latina nerds everywhere at Super Hero News. She hosts a podcast over there covering all thing men-in-tights. She’s not limited to comic books though, she’s also got a taste for the dark side, dabbling in horror.

Teresa Jusino

You may know Boricua Teresa Jusino from when she was Assistant Editor at The Mary Sue or as That Girl Who Did the Doctor Who Reviews on Tor.com. Now, she’s creating her own stories with the Pomonok Entertainment. Their motto? “Where nuanced female characters come standard.”

Zahira Kelly-Cabrera

Zahira Kelly-Cabrera describes herself as an “AfroDominicana mami, writer, artist (some may say ‘social media personality’), mujerista, award-winning sociocultural critic, and international speaker.” Consider us in love!

Lissete Lanuza Saenz

We’ll admit it. We’re fangirls. And that’s why we’re so into Lissete Lanuza Saenz, Co-Executive Editor at Fangirlish.com. There, she keeps us up to date on TV and movies as varied as Sunday night football, the Good Place, and Outlander. Tune in with us.

Latinx Geeks

We’re pretty into Alexis Sanchez and Reign at Latinx Geeks. Follow these mujeres on Twitter to stay up to date on all things sci-fi, comic book, and fantasy. They’re making waves hosting panels at Comic Con NY, standing up for survivors of abuse, and generally showing that Latinas belong everywhere.

Melissa Leon

Melissa Leon is the Entertainment Editor for The Daily Beast, meaning she gets to do cool stuff like interview Oscar Isaac. Also, influence a million readers a day with her reviews, reporting, and intersectional hot takes.

Kristen Lopez

Women of color are only 4.1% film critics and you KNOW only a tiny percent of that number is la raza. That’s why it’s so important that Kristen Lopez is writing for Rotten Tomatoes (not to mention The Hollywood Reporter, The Daily Beast, Remezcla). Movie buffs take note.

Yolanda Machado

The founder of Sassy Mama in LA, Yolanda Machado has been keeping it real since way back in 2010. Her media presence now also includes being one of the FEW women of color critics on Rotten Tomatoes, bylines at Harper’s Bazaar, Marie Claire, and Remezcla.

Janel Martinez

Janel Martinez founded Ain’t I Latina?, an online destination by Afro-Latina for Afro-Latinas that’s part activism, part cultural criticism, and all hella interesting. It’s exactly the type of thing that inspired us!

Tara Martinez

Currently at Elite Daily, Tara Martinez is one of those Latinas who’s made a career out of watching TV, writing down her thoughts, and making us all listen. She’s a journalist and a critic, helping us parse the latest celebrity gossip in addition to walking us through Black Mirror.

Claudia Puig

Claudia Puig is the OG of Latina film critics. She’s the PRESIDENT of the LA Film Critics’ Association, was lead film critic at USA Today for 15 years, and has been dishing up expert analysis for NPR since 2005.

Desiree Rodriguez

A creative, critic, and organizer, Desiree Rodriguez works in the comic book industry, created #BeingLatinxInComics, and publishes regularly on the intersection of gender and race in the DC and Marvel universes. Basically, if you’re into comics, you should know her.

Alejandra Salazar

Proud Tejana Alejandra Salazar is living your best life. She went to Stanford. She’s currently in NYC, working for WNYC’s Morning Edition. She writes about our Latinx community, politics, gender, and culture for folks like Refinery29 and NPR. Work it lady!

Miranda Sanchez

Miranda Sanchez is in front of the camera and behind the console, reviewing video games for IGN. We see her week in, week out as the only woman and person of color up there and she more than holds her own.

FacebookTwitter