Mujeres to Follow

AWAY (L to R) RAY PANTHAKI as RAM ARYA and HILARY SWANK as EMMA GREEN, in episode 109 of AWAY. Cr. DIYAH PERA/NETFLIX © 2020

At latinamedia.co, we don’t care what white guys think. Not about movies, TV, or politics. It’s not that they never have good ideas, it’s just that we’re so tired of hearing their perspective, particularly on things that are not meant for them. So when a show is made for us – for Latinas, for women, for Latinx folks – we want to know what our community has to say about it, not the white guys who usually sound off. And we think you do too. That’s why we created this series, “What Latina Critics Have to Say.” ¡Disfruta!

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Cruising Rotten Tomatoes, you’d think the only people with opinions on Hilary Swank’s Away are dudes with names like “Ben,” “Brian,” and “Bill.” Seriously, on their main page for the show, there were four times as many men whose names start with B (and I didn’t cheat and count the “Robert”) than there are women, let alone women of color, when we checked. These bros give the woman-led show a measly “critic score” of 54. But women like space/STEM/astronauts too. Hell, we might even be the intended audience for Away. So what do women critics have to say? And by “women” we mean Latinas, obvi:

AWAY (L to R) HILARY SWANK as EMMA GREEN in episode 101 of AWAY Cr. COURTESY OF NETFLIX © 2020

TV Review: Netflix’s Away Is The Grey’s Anatomy of Space

As people who want to live in Shondaland, we get everything we need to know about Away from the Dianda Reviews It All headline (we’re in!). Specifically, she writes, “The heart of Away is what keeps you hooked long enough to see it grow and become the show it wants to be; a realistic, grounded reflection… that everyone struggles, everyone dreams, and, in that, everyone is everyone.” Read Diandra’s full review.

AWAY (L to R) VIVIAN WU as LU WANG, MARK IVANIR as MISHA POPOV, HILARY SWANK as EMMA GREEN, RAY PANTHAKI as RAM ARYA, and ATO ESSANDOH as DR. KWESI WEISBERG-ABBAN in episode 101 of AWAY. Cr. DIYAH PERA/NETFLIX © 2020

In Netflix’s Away, Hilary Swank’s Gotta Leave This Doomed Earth to Save This Doomed Earth

Laura Bradley over at the Daily Beast also has lots of positive things to say about Away. She writes, “Enter Netflix’s Away—a gripping drama that embraces this galaxy of thematic potential while also grounding its action in reality. Oh, and its lead is a powerful, multi-faceted Hilary Swank—whose tenacity brings the show’s stakes to life in visceral, at times unsettling ways.” Want more reasons to watch? Check out her full review.

AWAY (L to R) BRIAN MARKINSON as GEORGE LANE and GABRIELLE ROSE as DARLENE in episode 101 of AWAY Cr. DIYAH PERA/NETFLIX © 2020

Why Netflix’s Away Finale Will Actually Make You Feel Better For Once

And for those ready for spoilers, Refinery29’s Ariana Romero breaks down Away’s finale, saying why it’s the show we need now, “When you listen to [showcreator] Hinderaker speak, it seems inevitable that the Atlas crew can get through anything if they continue to support each other. That message is a much needed emotional balm during our divided times.” Read her full coverage.

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Julie and the Phantoms

At latinamedia.co, we don’t care what white guys think. Not about movies, TV, or politics. It’s not that they never have good ideas, it’s just that we’re so tired of hearing their perspective, particularly on things that are not meant for them. So when a show is made for us – for Latinas, for women, for Latinx folks – we want to know what our community has to say about it, not the white guys who usually sound off. And we think you do too. That’s why we’ve launched this new series, “What Latina Critics Have to Say.” ¡Disfruta!

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We can’t help but root for Netflix’s Julie and the Phantoms. This import from Brazil (it’s a remake of Julie e os Fantasmas) stars Boricua Madison Reyes, singing and dancing and reminding us of  the High School Musical stars of old. We wish more Latinas, and particularly Afrolatinas, were paid to review the show but that doesn’t mean we can’t celebrate those who were:

Julie and the Phantoms

Everything We Know About Julie and the Phantoms Season 2

Over at Seventeen, Tamara Fuentes calls Julie and the Phantoms a “gem of a series” and summarizes it like this, “Julie and the Phantoms is Kenny Ortega’s latest hit and the High School Musical and Descendants creator is taking things to the next level with his brand new series.” Find out more by reading her full article.

Julie and the Phantoms

Kenny Ortega’s New Show Julie And The Phantoms Has Ghosts, Music, And Teen Drama — Here’s What Happens In The First Episode

Evelina Zaragoza Medina writes up the show in true BuzzFeed fashion – with lots of gifs and images. Our favorite quote of hers: “Music? A Latinx lead? A ghost rock band?? That’s too many good things to ignore, so I checked out the pilot.” Check out her listicle.

JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS (L to R) JEREMY SHADA as REGGIE, MADISON REYES as JULIE, OWEN JOYNER as ALEX, and CHARLIE GILLESPIE as LUKE in episode 106 of JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS Cr. KAILEY SCHWERMAN/NETFLIX © 2020

Julie and the Phantoms Review – Ghosts, Grunge and 90s Nostalgia

Ellen E. Jones of the Guardian made us feel old with this glowing review: “Netflix might just be on to something with Julie and the Phantoms, a sweet show carefully confected to unite every post-Saved By the Bell generation of TV-watching teens, from the My So Called Lifers (now in their 40s) to the High School Musical heads (late 20s).” Read her whole review.

JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS (L to R) JEREMY SHADA as REGGIE, OWEN JOYNER as ALEX, MADISON REYES as JULIE, and CHARLIE GILLESPIE as LUKE in episode 101 of JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS Cr. KAILEY SCHWERMAN/NETFLIX © 2020

Boricua Rising Star Madison Reyes Rocks the Lead in Netflix’s Julie and the Phantoms

Really, we can’t say enough about Reyes’s talent and Jhoni Jackson writing for Remezcla agrees, “Reyes embodies singer-songwriter Julie in the 9-episode series… Reyes stood out to [creator Kenny Ortega] as more than just a natural fit, but also the absolute ideal—despite having zero prior TV or film credits—among a nationwide talent search.” Read her full coverage.

JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS (L to R) JADAH MARIE as FLYNN, MADISON REYES as JULIE, CHARLIE GILLESPIE as LUKE, OWEN JOYNER as ALEX, and JEREMY SHADA as REGGIE in episode 102 of JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS Cr. EIKE SCHROTER/NETFLIX © 2020

Netflix’s Julie and the Phantoms Is FANTASTIC!

On her YouTube channel, Kristen Maldonado can’t stop talking about the songs, declaring “Another huge highlight of the show for me was the music… Not only are [the songs] catchy, they also really reflect the moments that our characters are dealing with, the issues that they’re going through, the situations they’re in. I thought it was just spot on.” Watch her full review.

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What Three Latinas Have to Say About the Emmy Nominations

This time is for us – Latinas, women, Latinx folks – and we want to know what our community has to say, not the white guys who usually sound off. And we think you do too. That’s why we created “What Latina Critics Have to Say.” ¡Disfruta!

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The Latinx community had a great year in television. Pose. Vida. One Day at a Time. The list goes on. The Television Academy should have celebrated our stars but they didn’t. As we work towards fixing that, let’s take a minute and listen to the Latinas who are making the case that the Academy can and must do better. Finally – we agree on something!

The Emmys Need To Stop Ignoring Latinx Women

Ariana Romero identifies the Television Academy’s “latest — and long-standing — racist erasure of Latinx femme talent,” writing in Refinery29, “While the Emmys’ voting body seems to believe Bledel is the only on-screen shining TV star in our community, the 2020 Emmys’ eligibility period was actually an embarrassment of riches in televised Latinx storytelling.” we couldn’t agree more. Read her full article.

Stop Acting Like There Aren’t Latinx Stars Deserving of Emmy Nominations: Opinion

Rosy Cordero drops lots of important points in this EW piece but we particularly love this one: “Critics will say, and have said, that talent from marginalized communities is looking for participation awards, but that’s simply not true. We don’t want anything that we don’t deserve. But it’s important to recognize that we are not playing on a level field. We want to earn a seat at the table, not because of our ethnic makeup but because we are talented and hard-working.” Preach! Read her full opinion.

What the Hell Do Latinx Actors and Shows Have to Do to Get an Emmy Nomination?

While recognizing the “too few” Latinxs nominated, Laura Bradley speaks directly to the problem, writing for the Daily Beast, “Each year, one can attribute the Emmys’ relatively small to nonexistent list of Latinx nominees to various circumstances. Anti-CW bias here, a show that’s lost the attention of the Academy there… But the one thing that seems to remain consistent is the scarcity of nominees itself. And thanks to a few recent cancellations, there are now no Latinx series left on network television. Qué barbaridad.” Read her full article.

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What Four Latina Critics Have to Say About “Cursed”

At latinamedia.co, we don’t care what white guys think. Not about movies, TV, or politics. It’s not that they never have good ideas, it’s just that we’re so tired of hearing their perspective, particularly on things that are not meant for them. So when a show is made for us – for Latinas, for women, for Latinx folks – we want to know what our community has to say about it, not the white guys who usually sound off. And we think you do too. That’s why we’ve launched this new series, “What Latina Critics Have to Say.” ¡Disfruta!

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We love that Afrolatina Zetna Fuentes directed the pilot of Netflix’s Cursed. It’s about time we dismantle the King Arthur legend and reimagine it as woman-centric folklore while we’re at it. But should we watch? Latina critics don’t agree (on anything) so we’ve collected a sample of the reviews below to help you decide.

TV Review: Netflix’s Cursed Is A Dark Addition To Your YA Addiction

Diandra Rivera of Diandra Reviews It All likes Cursed… mostly. She writes, “There wasn’t the usual ‘fun’ you expect from YA series, and, though there were instances of magic and lore, the series is, at best, a mythical reflection of colonialism… Frankly, I think what makes a successful YA series is that you dream of and for its characters, and, while Cursed has its struggles, it does make you dream.” Read her full review.

All the Questions We Need Answered in “Cursed” Season Two

Tamara Fuentes over at Seventeen is covering Cursed like it’s her job… And our favorite piece she’s written on it contains some serious spoilers (so be careful if you click through). In it, she writes, “If you still haven’t seen 13 Reasons Why star Katherine Langford’s brand new show, Cursed, then you’re in for a ride. Katherine plays Nimue, also known in Arthurian legend as The Lady of the Lake. However, unlike the original tale, she has the Sword of Power and trust me when I say that she’s ready to take the throne.” Read her full article.

I Watched Netflix’s “Cursed” So You Don’t Have To

Kristen Maldonado was not impressed, saying on her YouTube channel, “I think on paper Cursed sounds like a brilliant story, allowing us to focus on the lady of the lake who plays a crucial role in the stories around King Arthur… [But] it doesn’t feel like the stakes are as high as they could be because everything seems to work out pretty easily for these characters.” Watch her full review.

REVIEW: “Cursed” Changes Up Arthurian Legend for the Better

For But Why Tho?, Kate Sánchez likes Cursed but has this issue, “While Cursed’s themes are important, it falls into the same trap of many other fantasy narratives that uses a central white figure as the way to see marginalization, and in this one, given the diverse cast, makes it stand out all the more… It’s important for narratives that look to tell stories of marginalization and oppression to take them into consideration, even in fantasy.” Read her full review.

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What Four Latina Critics Have to Say About “Mucho, Mucho Amor”

At latinamedia.co, we don’t care what white guys think. Not about movies, TV, or politics. It’s not that they never have good ideas, it’s just that we’re so tired of hearing their perspective, particularly on things that are not meant for them. So when a show is made for us – for Latinas, for women, for Latinx folks – we want to know what our community has to say about it, not the white guys who usually sound off. And we think you do too. That’s why we’ve launched this new series, “What Latina Critics Have to Say.” ¡Disfruta!

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Mucho, Mucho Amor: The Legend of Walter Mercado hit Netflix earlier this month and our timeline was full of the Latinx Liberace energy and nostalgia. The capes, the lack of gender conformity, the horoscopes, the amor. Here, we’ve collected our favorite takes and surprise – Latinas don’t agree, even on a legend.

Watch Walter Mercado Offer Mucho Mucho Amor in First Trailer for Netflix Documentary

Rosy Cordero premiered the film’s trailer over at EW, writing, “What the film does exceptionally well is humanizing a man who others admired as a magical being, or even a superhero. Being called a superhero is actually the perfect comparison for a person who enjoyed wearing fabulous capes as much as Mercado did. And Mucho Mucho Amor, well, it’s his origin story.” Read her full review.

Glam, Astrology, & Love: Inside Netflix’s Latinx Love Letter Mucho Mucho Amor

For Refinery29, Ariana Romero writes, “What makes Mucho Mucho Amor — and its leading man — so special, particularly to millennials. It celebrates the exuberant queer glamour of Mercado, his powerful connection to Latinidad, his DNA-level savvy for meme-ability, and his relentless love for other people (the way he says ‘my good friends’ will break your heart).” Read her full review.

Walter Mercado Was Not Just a Legend, He was a Con Man

For Fangirlish, Lissette Launza Sáenz brings the whole truth, writing “A part of me understands the documentary, the celebration, the idea that this larger-than-life figure, one that was always flamboyant, non-binary and transcendent, deserves a spotlight. It just worries me that, for a documentary who pretended to show us the rise and fall of a legend, they only focused on the mucho, mucho amor, and not the mucho, mucho dolor he caused so many people.” Read her full review.

Netflix’s Enchanting Walter Mercado Documentary Radiates with “Mucho Mucho Amor”

Over at the A.V. Club, Danette Chavez points out, “Mercado proved you could be idolized while still being othered, a fact that’s too often glossed over in stories of marginalized people who break down barriers. But that reality couldn’t dampen Mercado’s love–or lust, as he put it—for life, nor does it prevent Mucho Mucho Amor from radiating with it.” Read her full review.

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18 Críticas to Follow

SOOOOOO it turns out that media criticism is just as f’ed up as Hollywood itself. You see, most film critics are male and pale and this has major effects on which films get to market. But, as you know, white dudes aren’t the only media nerds these days and they certainly don’t speak for all of us. To help you find people’s opinions you might actually relate to, we found 18 amazing mujeres writing on media that you should follow. Like literally, we made a twitter list for you. FOLLOW THEM.

Natasha S. Alford

Natasha S. Alford is an award-winning journalist, taking home trophies from the likes of Harvard, CBS, and GirlBoss. As Deputy Editor of The Grio, she unflinchingly investigates what’s going on in our culture from gun violence to Queen Sugar to electoral politics.

Vanessa Erazo

Vanessa Erazo is KILLING IT at our very own Remezcla, as the “head Cinenerd aka Film Editor.” She does cool shit like getting paid to go to the Tribeca Film Festival, fangirl over Oscar Isaac, and uplift Latino films. Basically, we want to be her when we grow up.

Julianne Escobedo Shepard

The biggest badies in media are called “Editor in Chief” and that’s exactly what Julianne Escobedo Shepard is. Of Jezebel. It’s a little blog. You may have heard of it. Over there, she gets to write and ASSIGN stories on everything from the movies to politics to fashion. Be swoon our beating hearts!

Maria Elena Fernandez

Maria Elena Fernandez is the type of Cubana who always gets a “senior” added after her name. These days, she writes for New York Magazine and Vulture and has contributed to the LA Times, Daily Beast, NBC News, etc. Follow her for the Latina perspective on everything from natural disasters to the Oscars.

Sabina Graves

Writer/director for Grinning Graves studio, Sabina Graves also reps for Latina nerds everywhere at Super Hero News. She hosts a podcast over there covering all thing men-in-tights. She’s not limited to comic books though, she’s also got a taste for the dark side, dabbling in horror.

Teresa Jusino

You may know Boricua Teresa Jusino from when she was Assistant Editor at The Mary Sue or as That Girl Who Did the Doctor Who Reviews on Tor.com. Now, she’s creating her own stories with the Pomonok Entertainment. Their motto? “Where nuanced female characters come standard.”

Zahira Kelly-Cabrera

Zahira Kelly-Cabrera describes herself as an “AfroDominicana mami, writer, artist (some may say ‘social media personality’), mujerista, award-winning sociocultural critic, and international speaker.” Consider us in love!

Lissete Lanuza Saenz

We’ll admit it. We’re fangirls. And that’s why we’re so into Lissete Lanuza Saenz, Co-Executive Editor at Fangirlish.com. There, she keeps us up to date on TV and movies as varied as Sunday night football, the Good Place, and Outlander. Tune in with us.

Latinx Geeks

We’re pretty into Alexis Sanchez and Reign at Latinx Geeks. Follow these mujeres on Twitter to stay up to date on all things sci-fi, comic book, and fantasy. They’re making waves hosting panels at Comic Con NY, standing up for survivors of abuse, and generally showing that Latinas belong everywhere.

Melissa Leon

Melissa Leon is the Entertainment Editor for The Daily Beast, meaning she gets to do cool stuff like interview Oscar Isaac. Also, influence a million readers a day with her reviews, reporting, and intersectional hot takes.

Kristen Lopez

Women of color are only 4.1% film critics and you KNOW only a tiny percent of that number is la raza. That’s why it’s so important that Kristen Lopez is writing for Rotten Tomatoes (not to mention The Hollywood Reporter, The Daily Beast, Remezcla). Movie buffs take note.

Yolanda Machado

The founder of Sassy Mama in LA, Yolanda Machado has been keeping it real since way back in 2010. Her media presence now also includes being one of the FEW women of color critics on Rotten Tomatoes, bylines at Harper’s Bazaar, Marie Claire, and Remezcla.

Janel Martinez

Janel Martinez founded Ain’t I Latina?, an online destination by Afro-Latina for Afro-Latinas that’s part activism, part cultural criticism, and all hella interesting. It’s exactly the type of thing that inspired us!

Tara Martinez

Currently at Elite Daily, Tara Martinez is one of those Latinas who’s made a career out of watching TV, writing down her thoughts, and making us all listen. She’s a journalist and a critic, helping us parse the latest celebrity gossip in addition to walking us through Black Mirror.

Claudia Puig

Claudia Puig is the OG of Latina film critics. She’s the PRESIDENT of the LA Film Critics’ Association, was lead film critic at USA Today for 15 years, and has been dishing up expert analysis for NPR since 2005.

Desiree Rodriguez

A creative, critic, and organizer, Desiree Rodriguez works in the comic book industry, created #BeingLatinxInComics, and publishes regularly on the intersection of gender and race in the DC and Marvel universes. Basically, if you’re into comics, you should know her.

Alejandra Salazar

Proud Tejana Alejandra Salazar is living your best life. She went to Stanford. She’s currently in NYC, working for WNYC’s Morning Edition. She writes about our Latinx community, politics, gender, and culture for folks like Refinery29 and NPR. Work it lady!

Miranda Sanchez

Miranda Sanchez is in front of the camera and behind the console, reviewing video games for IGN. We see her week in, week out as the only woman and person of color up there and she more than holds her own.

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