Five Latinas on ‘Ginny & Georgia’

GINNY & GEORGIA (L to R) ANTONIA GENTRY as GINNY and BRIANNE HOWEY as GEORGIA in episode 101 of GINNY & GEORGIA Cr. COURTESY OF NETFLIX © 2020

In we-are-not-a-monolith news, Latina critics are split on Netflix’s Ginny & Georgia. The show purposefully echoes fan-favorite Gilmore Girls — starring a young mom and her teenage daughter in a picturesque small Eastern town — even name-dropping the original in the trailer. However the biggest difference is Ginny, the Rory character, is played by Black actress Antonia Gentry. While Gilmore Girl’s actress Alexis Bledel is Argentinan, most fans didn’t know because Rory is just white in the show. So what are the sticking points for Latinas? Let’s find out.

Ginny & Georgia Is the First 2021 Binge-Watch

Dianda Rivera of Diandra Reviews It All enjoys the show, seeing important takeaways for Latina viewers. She writes, “Gentry makes Ginny embody the journey of many biracial girls as they try to find where they stand in a world still divided between white and black. This was really powerful to me, particularly, as a Latina that doesn’t quite fit whiteness or blackness. Her struggles with beauty, identity, and self-love are totally relatable.” Read her full review.

Ginny & Georgia’s Ginny Explains The “Surprise” of the Series’ Big Sex Scene

For Refinery29Ariana Romero dives into the sexual politics of the show, interviewing Gentry for more details. Romero writes, “Gentry was happy to see her character ‘pounce’ on exactly what she wants in the moment, adding, ‘Kudos to her for that!’ As the pilot comes to a close, Ginny mediates on her first sexual experience, savoring the newfound ‘power’ she feels in herself and over Marcus. Since childhood, Georgia has been telling Ginny she could have either that power or passion from a man. Now she knows her preference, and it isn’t flowers and candy.” Read the full interview.

All the Questions We Need Answered in Ginny & Georgia Season 2

Tamara Fuentes finds plenty to like for the Seventeen set, writing, “Just when you thought you knew exactly what you were signing yourself up to with Ginny & Georgia, the show takes a wicked turn into the most surprising ride we’ve seen on our TVs so far this year. While so many of our questions were answered as we saw our favorite characters slowly uncover each other secrets and pasts, there’s still so many other things that stayed with us long after the finale is over.” Read more of her coverage.

GINNY & GEORGIA (L to R) BRIANNE HOWEY as GEORGIA and ANTONIA GENTRY as GINNY in episode 103 of GINNY & GEORGIA Cr. COURTESY OF NETFLIX © 2020
Iconic redux or problematic copy? Latina critics are split

If You Like Degrassi, You’ll Love Netflix’s Ginny & Georgia!

On her YouTube channelKay Maldonado calls the show “really compelling,” noting how it explores family, “the secrets we keep [from them], how far someone will go to protect their family, and the truth that maybe we all become our parents eventually whether we want to or not.” But she also finds “some plot points” that just “don’t work,” saying, “for a show about a mother and daughter duo there were times where I felt like they weren’t necessarily even in the same show… They kind of felt like they were in different genres. We have Ginny in this teen drama. And we have Georgia in this thriller mystery.” Watch her full review.

Ginny & Georgia Isn’t the New Gilmore Girls. It’s a Mess

While “there is potential,” mostly Laura Bradley finds the show confusing and confused. For the Daily Beast, she writes, “Perhaps the strangest thing about this series is how little time our titular heroines actually spend together. Georgia might be fiercely devoted to her children, but she’s too busy covering up her criminal activities (past and present) and romancing the town’s mayor (Scott Porter, AKA Jason Street in Friday Night Lights) to schedule much quality time.” There’s also the lack of character development with Bradley saying, “Unlike Rory Gilmore, whose lofty aspirations and ridiculously long reading list defined a great deal of who she was, Ginny’s trauma largely defines her.” Read her full review.

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