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Halloween

Vampires vs. the Bronx

Trick-or-treating may be canceled but Halloween in all its scary, campy glory is not. So let us invite you to check out the latest from Netflix, Vampires vs. the Bronx. Confronted with vampires, gentrification, and maple scones, our heroes are young Afrolatinos, their protective, Catholic moms, and, of course, the local bodega. Don’t believe us? Check out what these three Latina critics have to say:

Vampires vs. the Bronx

Young Afro-Latinos Shine in Netflix’s Vampires vs. the Bronx

“We have been asking for films centering young Latino kids, specifically Afro-Latinos, in TV & film stories for decades,” writes Kathia Woods in Remezcla and we couldn’t agree more. Thankfully, Vampires vs. the Bronx delivers in what Woods calls “campy fun at its best.” Need another reason to watch? Remember, it’s “impossible to not stress how seeing a young Afro-Latino centered in this adventure will help similar children know that they matter and are vital to the Latinx diaspora.” Read her full review.

Vampires vs. the Bronx

Vampires vs. the Bronx Review: Netflix’s New Film Explores How Gentrification Affects Communities of Color

Melissa Linares of The Young Folks writes, “This latest entry into the horror/comedy genre borrows some elements from other vampire fighting franchises, although a moment with garlic adobo is a type of specific comedy that’ll have you laughing out loud… What this movie leaves you feeling, however, is that there is power in community and that the voices and stories of people of color matter and should be heard, no matter how hard others try to silence them.” Read her full review.

Vampires vs. the Bronx

Vampires vs. The Bronx is Opening the Door For New Vampire Fans

At But Why Tho?, Kate Sánchez says through the film, “I realized for the first time how equipped a Latinx household is to face on blood-sucking gentrifiers if it should ever come to it… Vampires vs. the Bronx thrives as a film because of how [Director Oz] Rodriguez has worked Latinidad into the very core of the narrative.” Read her full review.

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I’ll Have The Culture, Hold the Humanity

Today is November 1st aka the day every year Latinx women are reminded just how much we’re worth which – 47 percent less than white men and 31 percent less than white women aka not a lot. That’s right, on average Latinx women have to work an extra 10 months and a day to earn as much money as white men made in just 2017.

While these numbers are heartbreaking, let’s be honest: 2018 has been a difficult year for more than just the growing wage gap (yeah, we lost a penny this year with last year’s wage gap at 54 cents to the white man’s dollars and this year’s versus this year’s 53 cents). From spring to August of 2018, around 6,000 Latinx people (including at least 3,000 children) were separated from their families at the border. The media presented Americans with pictures of terrified families, as immigrants pleaded for their humanity to be recognized and respected.

And in the last two weeks, conveniently just before the midterm election, Donald Trump has created a racist narrative about a group of 4,000 migrants from Central America heading towards the border. “Criminals and unknown Middle Easterners are mixed in. I have alerted Border Patrol and Military that this is a National Emergy.” (yes that’s not a spelling error he said “emergy”)

Not only did the President paint a group of people trying to make a better life for themselves as criminals, he definitively declared Middle Easterners to be terrorists and not to be trusted. A reminder that not only is our President racist but generally lacks a comprehensive understanding of spelling and grammar.

And to finish it all off on Sunday this week, Donald Trump announced he wants to sign an executive order ending “birthright citizenship” for babies of non-citizens born on U.S. soil. We all know he’s targeting the Latinx community with that one. Questioning our right to citizenship combined with the horrible overtly racist coverage of migrants from Central Americans seeking refuge in the U.S., made the last two weeks pretty rough for the Latinx community.

So when I see cempasúchil flowers in window displays, or Instagram posts of people with a skeleton painted on their faces, or the overall increase in Frida Kahlo paraphernalia, I am reminded of our country’s hypocrisy. White America may love the “fun” pieces of Latinx culture, but they sure as hell don’t embrace actual Latinx people.

Latinx women are worth more than merely 53 cents for every dollar a white man makes. Our ancestors and traditions have given America the diversity and depth that make it was it is today. So when you see hip interpretations of calaveras de azúcar or wander down the salsa aisle at the grocery store or hell, EAT A TACO, remember the families separated at the border, and the hundreds of thousands of DACA recipients trying to convince their neighbors of their right to stay in the U.S. and the women toiling away to make our families and our country work despite making pennies on the dollar. Today is a great place to start. Start paying Latinx women what we’re worth – consider it reparations for the official, Corona-sponsored U.S. holiday of Cinco de Mayo.

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